Obituaries

This sections lists obituarites from Jefferson County Kansas.  Click on the person's name listed below to view their obituary.

Name of Deceased Date of Death
Arnold, Elizabeth S. 1893
Barnes, Elizabeth 1925
Carter, John Thomas 1927
Carter, Melissa (Weir) 1937
Cathcart, Edith 1961
Crosby, William 1900
Dix, George M. 1894
Jones, Randle 1950
Kunkle, Cameron 1908
Kunkle, Jerome 1913
Lefever, Christopher 1929
Lefever, Elting 1957
Lefever, Sarah Jane (Sinnard) 1928
McClelllan, C. B. 1911
Morris, infant 1893
Nunley, infant 1893
Oroke, Georgia Anna (Dyson) 1935
Osborn, J. 1893
Robinson, John P. 1937
Rogers, Reuben B. 1919
Sample, Ruth 1914
Scurlock, George G. 1966
Shull, Alta (Robinson) 1966
Smith, Margaret Hepler 1905
Stanley, "father" 1881
Stein, Henry 1916
Tripp, child 1893
Weiser, ___, constable 1883
Weiser, Emma 1886
Weiser, Robert 1884
Weiser, Susan 1899
Williams, John William 1930
Williams, Matilda Anna (Carroll) 1926
Williams, Robert Victor 1939
Wright, child 1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obituaries Start Here:


KANSAS PIONEER TRIES TO KILL HIMSELF

The Topeka Daily Capital, 1 Sep. 1911

C. B. McClellan, of Oskaloosa Was Member of Wyandotte Convention

Special to the Capital:

Oskaloosa, Kan., Aug. 30- - - In a fit of temporary aberration of mind brought on by intense and prolonged suffering from illness, C. B. McClellan, of this place, attempted to end his life. Mr. McClellan has suffered with asthma for years, and as of late has been much worse than ever before, so that he has not been able to speak above a whisper for the last few days and has not been able to lie down for many weeks, and more than once said he would rather die than endure such suffering. This morning he asked his daughter for his razor and after shaving cut two gashes in his throat. The daughter coming into the room at the moment stopped any further effort.

McClellan is 88 years old, settled here in 1857. He was a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention and one of the best known citizens in the county.


The Oskaloosa Independent, Saturday February 19, 1881


A three year old child of Mr. WRIGHT residing near Mr. W.R. Crozier's died on last Thursday, and the snow was drifted so badly the remains had to be taken to the grave on a hand sled.--Five of the family were sick at one time, and about destitute. They need sympathy and help.(Little Slough)


The Valley Falls New Era, 16 Mar. 1916, page 5, col. 5

DIED IN IOWA

Monday morning word was received here of the death of Henry Stein at Carroll, Iowa.

Friday, February 25th, last, or only three weeks ago, he left here well and hearty, for Iowa to work in Carroll county where he was born 19 years ago.

After an illness of four or five days he died in a hospital Sunday night.

Henry was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Stein of Valley Falls and came here from Iowa with his parents seven years ago. He is survived by his parents, five brothers and six sisters and a host of friends.

The body arrived here Monday night accompanied by his father and sister Kate who reached his bedside Saturday.

The funeral was held from the Catholic church Wednesday morning and the burial was in St. Mary's cemetery, Father Justin conducting the services.

The bereaved parents, brothers and sisters have the sympathy of many friends in the loss of a dear member of the family and a boy well liked by all who knew him. His was the first death in the family.

He met death bravely, fortified by the rites of the Catholic church.

The deceased was a member of the Young Men's Holy Name Society, members of this society acting as pall bearers, Raymond and Raphael Kelly, John Hochstatter, Theo. Herbers, Bernard Truhe, and Edward Lynn. The large attendance at the funeral gave evidence of the high regard to which the deceased was held, and of the sympathy the community feels for the sorrowing family at the loss of one so young and promising.

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CARD OF THANKS

We desire to sincerely thank our many friends for their assistance and sympathy in the loss of our beloved son and brother, and for the floral offerings by the Holy Name Society and the Valley Falls Mercantile Co.

Mr. and Mrs. Anton Stein and Children.


The Nortonville News7 Feb. 1919

Reuben B. Rogers was born June 11, 1838 in Platt County, Missouri, and grew to manhood in that community, and about the year 1866 was united in marriage to Emanda M. Connelly. To this union was born seven children, two daughters and five sons, three of whom survive their father. They are : George and Arthur of Topeka and John of California.

In March 1867, Mr. Rogers with his wife moved to Kansas, and settled near Valley Falls, and then in about three years he moved near Nortonville, and Winchester which communities have been his home ever since, except a short time which he spent in Topeka and other communities. The subject of this sketch has lived in the community for fifty two years and was one of the early settlers of the state, and was one who knew what it was to endure the hardships of a new country, and the efforts that must be put forth to help develop it and bring it up to where it is today.

Mr. Rogers confessed his faith in Christ at a tabernacle meeting at Winchester, under the labors of Elder Newby, and afterwards transferred his membership to Nortonville, where he has been one of the faithful workers until his health became impared (impaired?), and made it impossible to meet with the brotherhood. He often expressed himself to the writer that he very much desired to attend services once more with his brethren and sisters, before he must lay his armor down which he realized must be before long. It seemed that it was impossible for him to have his wishes carried out because of his ever failing health.

Mr. Rogers passed away last Monday morning at 1:30, being 80 years, 7 months and 22 days of age, and thus a good man's work is finished but his works do follow him.

The funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 conducted by his pastor who spoke words of comfort to a large concourse of friends and neighbors who came to pay tribute of respect to a father, neighbor and friend, from the words of Solomon: "The righteous have hope to death." Proverbs 14:32

The subject of this sketch, leaves a loving companion, three sons, several grand children and a large host of friends to mourn his departure, but they mourn not as those who have no hope, for he was a good man and a Christian to the end. Peaceful be thy slumber, until the trumpet shall awake the saint of God. Interment was made in the Nortonville cemetery.

Rev. J. J. Ruppert


The Oskaloosa Independent, Saturday April 16, 1881


Mr. B. P. STANLEY's father died a short time since at his home in Massachusetts. he had been in feeble health for a long time, but his son was expecting him and his wife to come out here as soon as the weather settled this spring and spend the rest of their days with him. The news of the death was very unexpected.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 13 Apr. 1950, page 7, col. 1

RANDLE JONES

Randle Jones, 76, died at his home in Winchester, Thursday afternoon. He had lived in Jefferson County for 60 years. He leaves his wife Mrs. Mary Jones, two daughters, Velma Jones and Mrs. Elsie Fine, both of Winchester; two sons, Lloyd of Winchester and Everett of Lawrence; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Luse of McLouth, and Mrs. Maggie Luse of Jarbalo, Kans.; two brothers, Dexter and James Jones, both of Easton. Funeral services were held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Hampton Funeral Home in Oskaloosa and burial in the Wise cemetery near Winchester.


The Perry Mirror, 26 Feb. 1914, page 1, col. 4.

DEATH OF MRS. RUTH SAMPLE

Mrs. Ruth Sample died at the home of her youngest daughter, Mrs. Fanny Smith, Wednesday morning, Feb. 18, aged 94 years, 3 months and 25 days. Mrs. Sample had been in poor health for the past few years.

Mrs. Ruth Sample, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Carpenter, was born October 24, 1818. In 1841 she was united in marriage to John Henry Sample. To this union eight children were born, six of whom survive her. She united with the Methodist church when but a young woman and lived a true Christian live until the Savior, whom she lived and served, said,"Come home to rest."

Her husband passed away in 1860 and also was a true member of the Methodist Church.

She spoke many times that she wanted to go where there would be no more suffering or sorrow. She prayed every day for the loved ones, who survived her. She was a loving mother and we feel that she is at rest with the loved ones who went before her.  H.


The Meriden Ledger, 17 Feb. 1905

DEAD

Margaret Hepler Smith was born in Ohio Feb. 11, 1822, Died at Meriden, Kansas Geb. 11, 1905 at the ripe age of 83. She was married to Fredrick Smith in 1843. To this union were born 14 children, seven having preceeded her to the better world. Of the seven remaining, three reside in this vicinity, Mrs. Scott Hunt, Jackson and Uriah Smith. She was Christened in the Luthurn (sic) church in infancy and endeavored to bring her children up in that faith. Teaching them in infancy to lisp the name of Christ in Prayer.

She was a great sufferer, for years being unable to walk.

Services were held at the U. B. Church Monday after noon Feb. 13, and interment in the Meriden Cemetery.


The Winchester Star, 9 Sep. 1966


GEORGE G. SCURLOCK

Graveside services were held Tuesday at Abilene Cemetery for George G. Scurlock, 81, Winchester, who died Saturday in the Winchester hospital. He was born March 21, 1885 at Pocahontas, Ill., and spent most of his life in Dickinson and Jefferson counties. He was a retired farmer.
Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Candice Scurlock, at home; and a brother, John F. Scurlock, San Clemente, Calif.


The Winchester Star, 9 Sep. 1966

EDITH CATHCART

Services for Mrs. Edith O. Cathcart, 67, Lawrence, were held last Saturday at Rumsey Funeral Home in Lawrence with burial in Winchester Cemetery. She died Wednesday at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

She was born Aug. 22, 1899, at Winchester, and had lived at Lawrence about 40 years.

Survivors include her husband, Mark B. Cathcart, and one son, Don, both of the home, and one sister, Mrs. Luella O'Neill, McFarland, Wis.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 11 Jan. 1929

OBITUARY – LEFEVER

Christopher Lefever was born in Ulster County, New York, August 22, 1842 and died at his home near Oskaloosa, Kansas, January 3, 1929, age 86 years, four months and twelve days.

Mr. Lefever came to Kansas in 1868 and settled on a farm south of Oskaloosa. In 1873 he was united in marriage to Sarah Jane Sinnard who preceded him in death Jan. 26th, 1928.

Mr. Lefever is survived by his only son Elting of Oskaloosa.

The funeral service was held at the Methodist church on Friday afternoon with Rev. A. H. Tebben in charge. Interment was made in Pleasant View cemetery.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 3 Feb. 1928

SARAH JANE LEFEVER

Sarah Jane Sinnard was born near Kirksville, Iowa, July 16, 1852, and died at her home southwest of Oskaloosa, January 28, 1928, aged 75 years, 6 months and 12 days. She came with her parents to Oskaloosa in the year 1857 and grew to womanhood in and near this place.

She was married to Christopher Lefever December 31, 1873. To this union was born one son, Elting, of Oskaloosa, who with his aged father survive. Mrs. Lefever is also survived by two brothers, Hayden Sinnard, of Oskaloosa, and Ora Sinnard, of Kansas City, one sister, Mrs. Hattie Pashley, of Chicago, several nephews and nieces and a host of friends.

Mrs. Lefever possessed a kind and loving spirit, and although she has been in ill health for forty years, she has borne it patiently, and she will be greatly missed by all who knew her.

The funeral service was held at the Methodist church on Sunday afternoon, in charge of the Rev. A. H. Tebben. Interment was made in the Oskaloosa cemetery.

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We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for their expressions of kindness and floral offerings in our bereavement.

Chris Lefever, Elting Lefever


The Oskaloosa Independent, 4 Apr. 1957

OBITUARY – LEFEVER

Elting Lefever, 81, died Friday, March 29, at his home, corner of Delaware and Warren, in Oskaloosa. He had been ailing for several days and his "next friends", Mr. and Mrs. Scoville, had gone to the home at intervals to see how Elting was getting along.

Funeral was conducted from the Hampton funeral home Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Andy Gutierrez officiating, burial in Pleasant View cemetery. Elting was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Chris Lefever, born on a farm southwest of Oskaloosa, where most of his life was spent. After death of the parents, Elting moved into Oskaloosa.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 2 Sep. 1937

JOHN P. ROBINSON was born in Humansville, Mo., Feb. 19, 1872, and died at Oskaloosa, Kansas, Aug. 30, 1937, at the age of 65 years, 5 months and 11 days.

He came to Kansas at the age of six, and made his home with Mr. and Mrs. James Franklin Oroke of McLouth, Kansas, until he was united in marriage to Miss Alta Denning of Perry, Kansas, in 1893.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Alta Robinson of Oskaloosa, also the following children: Elwood Robinson of Oskaloosa, Mrs. Veva Cromwell of Kansas City, Eugene Robinson of Topeka, Harry Robinson of Kansas City, and 9 grandchildren. Three foster brothers also survive him: John R., R. E. and Galen Oroke.

A son, Sherman Robinson, died April 19, 1928. His mother, Mrs. John Carter, died in February of 1937, and his foster mother, Mrs. James Franklin Oroke, died in January of 1935.

Mr. Robinson united with the Dunkard church at McLouth in the spring of 1913.

Funeral services were conducted by rev. E. A. Ahrens at the Presbyterian church, Oskaloosa at 2 p.m. on Wednesday. The music was by a male quartet and Horace Edmonds presided at the organ.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 31 Mar. 1966, page 1, col. 5

ALTA SHULL

Alta Shull, 89, passed away March 30. Funeral Services will be held Friday at 2:00 p.m. at the Oskaloosa Presbyterian Church. Burial will be in Pleasant View Cemetery. She is survived by two sons, Eugene Robinson, Topeka, Harry Robinson, New Franklin, Mo., and 3 step-children, Ivan Shull of Lawrence, Raymond Shull of Philadelphia, and Mrs. Gladys Glock of New York.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 7 Apr. 1966, page 3, col. 1

ALTA (ROBINSON) SHULL

Mrs. Alta (Robinson) Shull passed away March 30, 1966. Funeral services were held at the Oskaloosa Presbyterian church Friday, April 1, at 2:00 p.m., with Rev. William T. Means officiating. Burial was at Pleasant View Cemetery of Oskaloosa, Kansas.

Alta (Robinson) Shull was born April 20th, 1876, at the old Denning homestead, nine miles north of Perry, Kansas, and departed this life March 30, 1966, at the Jefferson County Memorial Hospital, Winchester, Kansas.

She lived all of her life in Jefferson County, and the last fifty years in the Oskaloosa community. She has two sons surviving her, Eugene Robinson, Topeka, Harry Robinson, New Franklin, Mo. Two sons and one daughter preceded her in death. Sherman Robinson passed away in 1928. Elwood Robinson who passed away in 1958 and a daughter, Vera (Robinson) Cromwell who passed away in 1963.

She is survived by two step-sons, Ivan Shull, of Lawrence, Kansas, and Raymond Shull of Cleveland, Ohio. One step-daughter, Mrs. Gladys Glock of Northfield, New Jersey. Twelve grandchildren, twelve great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren, several nieces and nephews and a host of friends.

She will be missed by all of those who knew her because of her cheerfulness and love for everyone she knew and her desire to help them.

We wish to thank friends, neighbors for their cards, flowers and many acts of kindness during the recent death of our mother, and grandmother. The family of Alta Shull.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 24 Jan. 1935

Mrs. GEORGIA OROKE

Georgia Anna Dyson was born May 6, 1861, in Athens County, Ohio, and departed this life at her home in Oskaloosa, Kansas, January 17, 1935, at the age of 73 years.

On January 1, 1880, she was united in marriage with James Franklin Oroke at McLouth, Kansas. To this union were born four sons, Edgar, dying in infancy, John Ray, Robert Emmet, and Charles Galen, all of Oskaloosa. Two others found this their home, John P. Robinson from the age of seven, and Mrs. Genie Taylor Walbridge of McLouth from the age of 12. Her husband preceded her in death by twenty-one years.

For two years after her marriage she resided on a farm south of McLouth, later moving on a farm in the Tibbott neighborhood. Here she united with the United Brethren church then after moving to Oskaloosa transferred her membership to the Methodist church where she remained a faithful member.

She leaves to mourn her death her three sons, ten grandchildren, two great grandchildren, two sisters, Mrs. Lucy Barnard, of Williamstown, Kansas, Mrs. Addie Ramey of Leavenworth, together with many other relatives and close friends.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon with Rev. Earl O. Harbour officiating. Interment was made in the McLouth Cemetery.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 22 Apr. 1937

Mrs. JOHN CARTER

Malissa, daughter of James and Catharine Weir, was born in Polk County, Mo., November 9, 1851, and passed from this life at the Bell Memorial hospital in Kansas City, April 11, 1937, at the age of 85 years.

She came to Kansas in early womanhood and located near McLouth where she resided until the time of her death.

In 1883 she was united in marriage with John Thomas Carter. To this union were born five children. They are Ludie Gensler of McLouth, and Francis of Walla Walla, Washington; Jesse, Charles and Ida having preceded her in death.

Mrs. Carter was a member of the Oskaloosa Methodist church. In her last years she often expressed herself as waiting to be received by her Lord.

She leaves to mourn her going besides Mrs. Gensler and Francis and John Robinson of Oskaloosa, a brother, also a son by a former marriage, fifteen grandchildren and ten great grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at the Oskaloosa M. E. church Tuesday afternoon with Rev. Earl O. Harbour officiating. Interment was made at Plum Grove.


The Oskaloosa Independent, 13 May 1927

OBITUARY – CARTER

John Thomas Carter was born May 30, 1860, at Louisville, Ky., died May 6, 1927 at Oskaloosa, Kansas, aged near 77 years. He came to Kansas at the age of six years, grew to manhood near Oskaloosa. In 1867 was married to Sarah Thompson. To them were born six children (but only names 5??): Mary A. Suschanke, Nancy J. Henry, and Willie R., all deceased; Lewis H. of Endicott, Wash., and Laura F. Mueller, of St. Louis, Mo.

In 1883 Mr. Carter was married to Melissa Robinson. To them were born five children: Jessie and Charles, deceased; Ida M. Trower, Topeka, Ks., Ludie Gensler, McLouth, Ks., Francis, of Walla Walla, Wash.

His living brother and sisters are: Francis M. of Winchester, Kans., Charles of Elkhart, Ks., Ella Jeffries, Seward, Okla., Jane Jeffries, Edmond, Okla.

Funeral service was conducted at the home hear Oskaloosa Sunday afternoon, May 8, by Rev. Dr. C. E. Kircher, pastor of the Presbyterian church. Hymns were sung by the Presbyterian male quartet. Interment was at Plum Grove.

We wish to thank all who assisted us and gave expression of sympathy in our bereavement.

Mrs. John Carter and family.


The Winchester Argus, 11 Sep. 1884

The remains of Mr. Robt. Weiser were taken through here last Saturday to Valley Falls, where they were interred in the Valley Falls cemetery Sunday. Not two years ago his father was brought home dead. Robt. died in the penitentiary where he was serving a term for horse stealing. It is sad. We pity his mother, wife and sisters.


The Valley Falls Register, 12 Sep. 1884

It was quite a surprise to most of our citizens, when the news came from Lansing, Kas., that Robt. Wieser (spelled as in newspaper) was dead. He died Friday night the 5th of Sept. of typho-malarial fever. The friends of the deceased had the remains shipped here for interment. The funeral occurred Sunday from the residence of his mother in this city, and was largely attended. Rev. Biggs and Eld Wade each spoke on the occasion, and the hearers will long remember what was said. Robt. Wieser was aged about 24 years, and was the only son of the late Daniel Wieser. He has gone to rest to work out his eternal sentence beyond. The sympathy of this people are extended to the bereaved friends and relatives. Such is life.


The Valley Falls New Era, 18 Nov. 1886

DEATH OF MISS EMMA WEISER

It becomes our sad and painful duty this week to chronicle the death of Miss Emma Weiser, daughter of Mrs. E. Weiser, widow of the late Daniel Weiser, which occurred last Monday evening at 8 o'clock. The deceased suffered from a complication of diseases and had suffered more or less from them for several weeks prior to the final moment. Bright's disease seems to have been the immediate cause of her death, and she suffered more than tongue can tell the last two or three days of her life, being delirious the greater part of the time.

Miss Weiser was a member of the millinery firm of Weiser Sisters and had by her excellent business and social qualifications won a host of warm friends who are deeply moved by her untimely death. She was but a little over twenty-six years old, and had always lived in or near Valley Falls.

The funeral took place Wednesday afternoon from the Methodist church, the services being conducted by Rev. L. C. Biggs. The attendance was large, considering the state of the weather, and many were the expressions of sympathy in behalf of the bereaved friends to whom the New Era also wishes to extend its condolence.


The Valley Falls Register, 19 Nov. 1886

IN MEMORIAM

It becomes our sad duty to record the death of Emma Weiser, which occurred Nov. 15th, 1886. Emma was born on the farm about two miles west of town Oct. 1st, 1860, and was at the time of her death 26 years, one month and fifteen days old. She was received into the Methodist church on probation by Dr. Denison Feb. 1st 1884 and the writer of this notice administered the rite of baptism Sept. 1st same year and received her into full connection. From this and all other earthly relations she has been summoned to the fellowship of kindred spirits beyond the skies. Emma was a good girl, deeply devoted to the welfare of her widowed mother and remained at her post of duty until exhausted nature could stand no longer, when she was removed from the store to the home to die. During her intense suffering she was constantly and lovingly cared for by her mother and sister and all that love could suggest or medical skill do, was done, but all was in vain, for Emma was called to leave the weary road of life and walk with Him in white who loved her and gave His life a ransom for her soul.

The funeral services were conducted by pastor in the Methodist church and notwithstanding the fact that the day was very stormy, a large audience were present to show their sympathy for the bereaved ones as well as their respect for the dead. And so one by one our loved ones pass away and leave our number on earth less, "But we shall still be joined in heart and hope to meet again.

L. C. BIGGS


The Valley Falls New Era, 18 Feb. 1899

AT REST

Mrs. Susan Weiser died at her home in the south part of the city, Wednesday night at 10 o'clock. Funeral services were held in the Lutheran church Friday morning, Rev. Hitchcock officiating.

Susan Walker was born in Clinton County, Penn., December 5th, 1821, being 78 years old at the time of her death. She was married in 1856 to Daniel Weiser. Nine children were born to them of which but two are now living.

Mrs. Weiser was an old settler here coming at the time of her marriage in 1856. She has led a long and useful life, always patient through her many trials, never complaining and generous to a penny. Kind hands helped where she now lies in peace.


The Winchester Argus, 13 Jan. 1883

A SHOOTING AFFAIR

Last Saturday Constable Weiser, of Valley Falls, was shot and killed while attempting to arrest Charley Cobb, a young man living three or four miles out of town. The particulars as we get them are: Young Cobb the night before at a literary society had behaved badly --- disturbed the society by boisterous conduct, shooting off his revolvers making threats, etc. Complaint was made next day and a warrant placed in the hands of officer Weiser for his arrest. The boy supposing an officer would be after him, early next morning went to town and procured a lot of ammunition --- converted himself into an armory and awaited the coming of the party to arrest him. After dinner the constable and his son, Robert, as deputy, went to Mr. Cobb's home; the young man went to the front door while the Constable went around the house. As son ass the young man appeared in the door, Charley leveled a Winchester rifle on him and told him if he made a motion he was a dead man. Mr. Cobb jumped between the two and got young Weiser out the door and entreated them to go away, fearing there would be blood shed, pledging himself responsible for the boy's appearance in court, but the officers were firm, said they had come after the boy and would take him. Charley ran out the back door to the well; Constable then fired at him and hit a little 12 year old brother, inflicting an ugly flesh wound in the thigh, at this juncture, young Weiser who was behind the house reached his arm around the corner to shoot, when Charley, who had an eye on that corner of the house too, fired and Weiser's arm was badly shattered. The two officers then retreated, when young Cob sent another ball after them which found lodgment in the Constable's back, who ran a couple rods farther, told his son he was killed and expired. Cobb immediately jumped on a horse, slung his rifle over his shoulder and fled, has not been heard of since.

Mr. Weiser had lived in the county a long time, had many friends and his untimely taken off is deeply regretted. The family have our heartfelt sympathy.

Mr. Cobb is also an old settler in this community, and has many friends, and while undoubtedly Charley is a very bad boy, the old gentleman is considered a man of honor and a gentleman. He also has our sympathy in his trouble.


The Winchester Star, Friday, August 24, 1900, page 1, col. Col. 3

County News and Comment

Wm. Crosby, a prominent resident of Valley Falls, died at Colorado Springs last Friday morning. The remains were brought to Valley Falls for burial and funeral services were held Monday.


The Valley Falls New Era, Saturday, August 25, 1900, page 1, col. 3

DEATH OF WM. CROSBY

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A Severe Shock to His Many Friends Here

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DIED AT COLORADO SPRINGS

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His Death Caused From a Complication of Diseases After a Short Illness -- Funeral Monday

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Just before going to press last week the sad news was received that our townsman, William Crosby, had died in Colorado Springs.

Mr. and Mrs. Crosby left this city Monday July 2, for Colorado Springs where they expected to remain until next April, where they have property interests, and where it was hoped Mr. Crosby's health would be benefitted by the change of climate.

Mr. Crosby's health had been in a precarious condition for some time, and although there were days when he was very feeble, he was not thought to be in a serious state.

After being in Colorado Springs a few weeks he was taken sick with mountain fever when a complication of diseases set in which caused his death.

William Crosby was born October 13, 1832, in Hampden, Maine. He was born and reared to manhood upon the same farm where his father was born, coming from puritan stock Simon Crosby, from whom he descended having left the mother country and settled in Salem, Mass., in 1835.

At the age of 20 he went to southern Illinois, where he remained two or three years, working as an assistant to the engineer, who had in charge the building of the Illinois Central railway.

In the spring of 1855 with his brother Rufus, he came to Kansas, locating in Atchison county,. One year later they came to Valley Falls, then Grasshopper Falls, and this has been his home ever since, with the exception of short periods spent in Colorado Springs.

In the fall of 1857 he married Mary Whitcomb who died in less than one year.

In 1861 he married Jennie Wyman, to whom was born one son, in 1862, the mother surviving the birth of the child but a short time and he followed his mother when six seeks old.

In the fall of 1894 he was united in marriage to Maria H. Prentice, who survives him, with their daughter Ruth, now the wife of Rev. Harold E. Anderson.

Mr. Crosby inherited from his mother a conscientious nature which has ever been the guiding principle of life.

In early manhood he identified himself with the followers of Christ. He was one of the founders and first deacon of the Congregational church in this place, and for most of the time since has continued to hold that office. He believed in applied Christianity, and all social, moral and political questions he decided by applying the principle of Christ's doctrine to them. His conscience allowed no compromise with wrong.

During the early days of Kansas he took a prominent part as a Free State man. He was a member of the Free State legislature, which met in Topeka, July 4, 1856, but was dispersed by the United States troops.

He with his brother, lost their entire property by the sacking of the town by the border ruffians. During the civil war he was a member of Co. K, 17th Kansas.

Om 1869 he was elected and served one term in the Kansas legislature. He was never a seeker after office, but preferred to be with the minority in politics, when he considered them right. He was well known for his business integrity. He had many friends. His benefactions were without ostentation. It was his rule of life to deny himself luxuries that he might help to support the church and benevolent objects. He was ever a diligent man to the last days of his life and there is no doubt but his days were cut short by his desire to be engaged in useful occupation.

The funeral services were held in the Congregational church Monday morning at 9: 30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Ralph Newman of Leavenworth.

The church was handsomely decorated by the young people of the church, and every available space was occupied by his friends.

Mayor Cowan issued a proclamation Monday morning requesting all business houses to close during the funeral service.

After the services at the church a large procession of friends followed the remains to Rose Hill cemetery where the burial took place.


The Valley Falls Vindicator, Friday, August 24, 1900, page 4, col. 4

DUST TO DUST

The Mortal Remains of Wm. Crosby Laid to Rest.

As briefly noted in these columns last week Wm. Crosby one of the pioneer business men of Valley Falls died in Colorado Springs Friday morning, , August 17, after a brief illness of Mountain fever, at the age of 67 years, 10 months and 4 days.

The body was brought home Saturday evening and the funeral, attended by hundreds of sorrowing friends, was held in the Congregational church Monday at 9:30 a.m. Rev. Ralph Newman, a former pastor of this place, came up from Leavenworth, to make as he expressed it "a few parting remarks to a beloved friend -- not as a clergyman to preach a funeral sermon."

The following notes compiled by a friend may be termed the principal milestones along the life pathway of Wm. Crosby, but of necessity there are omitted thousands of every day acts of charity, kindness and humanity which will be cherished by his fellow men so long as memory exists.

May his reward be in accord with that broad mantle of charity with which he was ever wont to cover the frailties and shortcomings of those erring mortals who were unable to withstand the temptations to which the flesh is heir -- in short he was one of nature's noble men -- an honest man.

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William Crosby was born October 13, 1832, in Hampden, Maine. He was born and reared to manhood upon the same farm where his father was born, coming from Puritan stock. Simon Crosby from whom he descended, having left the mother country and settled in Salem, Mass., in 1635.

At the age of 20, Mr. Crosby went to southern Illinois, where he remained two or three years, working as an assistant to the civil engineer, who had in charge the building of the Illinois Central railroad.

In the spring of 1855, with his brother Rufus, he came to Kansas locating in Atchison county. One year later they came to Valley Falls, then Grasshopper Falls, and this has been his home every since, with the exception of short periods spent in Colorado Springs.

In the fall of 1858 he married Mary Whitcome, who died in less than one year.

In 1861 he married Jennie Wyman, to whom was born one son, in 1862, the mother surviving the birth of the child but a short time and the boy following his mother when but six weeks old.

In the fall of 1864 he was united in marriage to Maria H. Prentice. Who survives him, with their adopted daughter Ruth, now the wife of Rev. Harold E. Anderson.

Mr. Crosby inherited from his mother a conscientious nature which has ever been the guiding principle of his life.

In early manhood he identified himself with the followers of Christ. He was one of the founders and first deacons of the Congregational church in this place, and for most of the time since has continued to hold that office. He believed in applied Christianity, and all social, moral and political questions he decided by applying the principles of Christ doctrine to them. His conscience allowed no compromise with wrong.

During the early days of Kansas he took a prominent part as a Free States man. He was a member of the Free State legislature, which met in Topeka July 4, 1856, but was dispersed by the United States troops.

He, with his brother, lost their entire property by the sacking of the town by the border ruffians. During the Civil War he was a member of Co. K. 17th Kansas.

In 1869 he was elected, and served one term in the Kansas legislature. He was never a seeker after office, but preferred to be with the minority in politics, when he considered them right. He was well known for his business integrity. His benefactions were without ostentation. It was his rule of life to deny himself luxuries that he might help to support the church and benevolent objects. He was ever a diligent man to the last days of his life and there is no doubt but his days were cut short by his desire to be constantly engaged in some useful occupation.


The Perry Mirror, Thursday, April 30, 1908, page 4, col. 3

CAMERON KUNKLE DEAD

Cameron Kunkle died in Excelsior Springs last Sunday after an illness of several weeks with Bright's discase. The remains were brought here Monday and the funeral was held from the home of his sister, Mrs. Mary Martin, yesterday afternoon and was largely attended. The Rev. Shutt conducted the service. Burial was in Oak Ridge cemetery. Mr. Kunkle was born in Jefferson county, Kan., March 8, 1861, his age being 47 years, 1 month and 29 days. He was a man of generous disposition and enjoyed a large circle of friends. The deceased was a son of Mr. Jerome Kunkle and a brother of Mrs. Mary Martin and Walter Kunkle. A large number of relatives and friends from various sections of the country attended the funeral yesterday.


The Oskaloosa Independent, Friday, May 1, 1908, page 4, col. 2

"Perry Items"

Cameron Kunkel, the elder son of Capt. Jerome Kunkel, died at Excelsior Springs Sunday. The body was brought to Perry Monday and taken to the home of his sister, Mrs. Mary K. Martin, where the funeral was held Wednesday. There was a large attendance at the funeral, friends being present from Kansas City, Denver and other points. He is survived by his father, a brother and a sister.


The Perry Mirror, Thursday, April 10, 1913, page 5, col. 2

DEATH COMES TO JEROME KUNKEL

Jerome Kunkel died at the home of his son, Walter Kunkel, near Williamstown, Wednesday morning, April 9, of senility, at the age of 86 years. He had been in poor health for several years and during the last year failed greatly in strength. Mr. Kunkel was born near Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pa., March 27, 1827, and was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Kunkel, who were among the early settlers of the Keystone state. He was very prominent in early history of this state, being a captain in a Kansas regiment during the Civil war and later served as a Representative from this district. He took part in the Mexican war, serving two years in the engagements against the southern republic.

The funeral will be held at the home of Walter Kunkel at Williamstown, Friday morning, April 11, at 10 o'clock. Rev. D. A. Shutt of the East Side Methodist Episcopal church of Topeka will preach the sermon. The remains will be interred in the Kunkel lot in Oak Ridge cemetery north of Perry.


The Oskaloosa Independent, Friday, April 18, 1913, page 4, col. 4

JEROME KUNKLE DEAD

Jerome Kunkle was born near Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pa., Mar. 11, 1827, and died April 9, 1913, aged 86 years and 28 days.

His boyhood was spent on his father's farm, where and at a time when education was not valued as it is today, but, when in 1846 a call for volunteers was made to go to the then far-away Mexico young Jerome, who was then 21 years old, enlisted as a private under Col. John W. Geary, and of the 96 men who enlisted only 27 were mustered out, which would tell that following Gen. Scott in his campaign in the subjugation of Mexico was a dangerous as well as a strenuous life, in 1848, after having returned home he was appointed aid-de-camp to Gov. Wm. E. F. Johnston of Pennsylvania, with the rank of lieutenant colonel. In 1854 he was appointed inspector of troops by Gov. William Bigier.

In 1856 he again started westward and located at Rising Sun, just across the Kaw from Lecompton.

The following year he returned to Pennsylvania and married Miss Christina Artley. Returning to Kansas the same year he now engaged in the arduous undertaking of establishing a home, helping to make Kansas a free state and rearing a family. These were turbulent times, and as Lecompton was a pro-slavery town and Rising Sun a free state village, and he the owner of the ferry at the time, he probably saw more and knew more of what was then going on than any other man in Jefferson county.

When the turmoil and strife finally culminated in war, he again came to his country's aid by volunteering as a private; but was chosen captain of Co. D of the famous 11th Kansas Volunteers.

In 1865 he was elected Representative from Jefferson county and again in 1876. Thus it will be seen that he was ever ready to serve his country either in the capacity of private citizen, soldier or lawmaker, as the occasion demanded.

In June, 1887, he buried his wife who had borne him four children, three of whom grew to man and womanhood. Camerion, the eldest, was buried five years ago this month. Walter lives near Williamstown and Mary near Perry.

The time intervening since then until death claimed him has been spent in part with children and part on some mining claims in New Mexico. During the last three years he has failed steadily in health and has divided his time between his daughter Mary and son Walter, where each ministered to his every want. The last year was spent at Walter's where kind hands and loving hearts did all they could to brighten his last days. Death came as a relief as he was willing and eager to go. Funeral conducted by Rev. D. A. Shutt of the East Side M. E. Church of Topeka and interment took place in Oak Ridge cemetery, north of Perry.


The Perry Mirror, 21 May 1925, page 6, col. 3

DEATH OF MRS. BARNES

Mrs. Elizabeth Barnes died Friday, May 15, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Guy Pearson, at Williamstown. Mrs. Barnes was 87 years old and more than 50 years of her life had been spent in and near Perry. The past 12 years she had made her home at Topeka with a daughter, Mrs. L. E. McCain. She went to Williamstown about a month ago to visit. Death was due to old age. Besides Mrs. Pearson and Mrs. McCain she is survived by three other children. Mrs. Fred Michael, Perry; Mrs. Sam Brown, Lawrence; and James Barnes, Topeka. Services were held Sunday afternoon at the Williamstown Baptist church. Burial was made in the Williamstown cemetery.


The McLouth Times, 23 Nov. 1939, page 4, col. 2

OBITUARY - WILLIAMS

Robert Victor Williams was born at California, Mo., April 11, 1887, and passed away at his country home, near McLouth, Nov. 14, 1939. In 1911 he moved to Kansas, settling near Muscotah. The following year on Christmas eve, he was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Arnold and in the year 1913 those young home builders moved to their present home site.

Four children were born into this home: Mrs. Charles Davison, Lee's Summitt, Mo.; Dorothy of the home; John of the home and University of Kansas, and David Ray of Lee's Summitt, Mo. All four children survive their father.

Besides his wife and children, Mr. Williams is survived by a brother, Albert Williams of Yates Center, Kansas, and two sisters; Mrs. Maud Chapman of McLouth, Kansas and Mrs. Floyd Brown of Oxnard, California; one brother, David Ray was killed in action in the world war seven days before the signing of the Armistice in 1918.

A host of friends sympathize with this good family in their hour of grief.

Friends and relatives who were in McLouth with the R. V. Williams family in their bereavement are a brother Mr. Al Williams, Yates Center, Kans.; Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Davison, Kansas City, Mo.; Mrs. Galen White, Mrs. Paul Brackenman of Kansas City, Mo.

Neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Charley Coffman, Ted Buchheim, Clinton, Kans.; Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Moses of Basehor, Kansas.

Mrs. Grabel from Frankfort, Kas., sister of Mrs. Williams, spent several days with the Williams family, leaving Sunday.


The McLouth Times, 26 Aug. 1926, page 5 col. 3

OBITUARY - WILLIAMS

Matilda Anna Carroll was born at Clarksburg, Mo., Nov. 19, 1862, and passed from this life August 19, 1926, aged 63 years, 9 months. She was married to John W. Williams Sept. 24, 1884. Their six children were: Albert, of near Tonganoxie; Mrs. Maud Chapman, McLouth; Flora, who died in infancy; David Ray, who gave his life as a soldier in France; Mrs. Tasie Brown of Tonganoxie.

Mr. and Mrs. Williams removed to Kansas twenty years ago and for 13 years resided at the present home between McLouth and Tonganoxie.

She was converted at the age of 18 and joined the Mt. Pleasant Baptist church near Clarksburg. In July, 1926 her membership was transferred to McLouth Baptist church.

Beside her husband and four children and five grandchildren, she is survived by three brothers and a sister; Robert Carroll, Los Angeles; Eldreige Carroll, Kansas City; John Carroll, Clarksburg, Mo., Eliza Smith, Sedalia, Mo.

Mrs. Williams was a good wife and devoted mother, giving herself unstintedly for those she loved. She was a good Christian woman --- loved and read her Bible. Another defender of the faith gone to be with her Lord, where she will await the coming of her loved ones as only an anxious mother can.

She was a member of the Knights and Ladies of Security and of Rinda chapter O. E. S.

Funeral services were held at the Baptist church, McLouth, Sunday, August 22, conducted by the pastor, Rev. S. M. Petty, and at the McLouth cemetery by Rinda chapter O. E. S., Aleione chapter of McLouth attending in a body.

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Card to Thanks

We wish to thank the friends and neighbors for their many acts of kindness and expressions of sympathy, and for the floral offerings.

J. W. Williams and children

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The McLouth Times, 22 May 1930, page 5, col 3

OBITUARY - WILLIAMS

Another of McLouth's older citizens has passed on. John Wm. Williams died at his home just after midnight, on Saturday morning, May 17th at the age of 78 years. Mr. Williams was born at California, Mo., Dec. 23, 1851, and has been a citizen of Kansas for the past 28 years.

On Sept. 25, 1884, Mr. Williams was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Carroll, and to their union six children were born. One daughter, Flora, passed away in infancy and a son, Ray, paid the supreme price of life in action in France in World War. The surviving children are two sons, Alberet, of Chanute, and Victor, of Tonganoxie, and two daughters, Mrs. Earl Chapman and Mrs. Floyd Brown, of McLouth. Mrs. Williams passed away on August 18, 1926, after nearly forty-two years of happy married life.

Mr. Williams was converted in youth and united with the Pisgale Baptist church, in Missouri, later bringing his membership to the Baptist church of McLouth.

He was also a member of Lyra Lodge, No. 256 A.F. & A.M. at McLouth.

On Sept. 27, 1927 he was married to Mrs. Emma Glynn, of McLouth, who gave him care and devotion in his last and long illness, and as his window, survives him.

Besides his immediate family he is survived by five grandchildren. Mr. Williams was a kind and loving father and a good husband. All that could be done for him was unselfishly offered in his long illness, by his wife, his children and the daughters of his wife. He will be missed by a host of friends. His faith was in Christ.

The funeral occurred Sunday afternoon, from the first Baptist church, conducted by Wallace Carpenter of Clay Center, and music was by Miss Freida Bradford, Miss Velma Cox, Harold and Claude Black. Pall-bearers were Alvin Means, Fred Cox, Arthur Chapman, Will Pyle, Perry Bradord and Will Dobbs. Burial was at McLouth cemetery.

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Card of Thanks

We wish to thank Rev. Mr. Carpenter, the choir, our friends and neighbors for their kindness to us in our recent bereavement, also for the beautiful flowers.

Emma Glynn Williams and Family

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ATTENDED FUNERAL

The following out of town relatives and friends were at the Earl Chapman home Sunday to attend the funeral of Mr. J. W. Williams; Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Fuerlst of California, Mo., Mr. Gus Davidson, Mrs. E. W. Carroll and Misses Elfreida and Marie Carroll of Kansas City, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Williams, Chanute, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Dickenson, Mr. and Mrs. Glen Davidson, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Davidson and Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Bradley, all of Tonganoxie.

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Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends and relatives for their kindness and sympathy shown us in our recent bereavement and for the beautiful floral offerings.

H. W. Williams

R. W. Williams

Maude Chapman

Tasie Brown


The Meriden Tribune, 28 Dec. 1894

A probate notice appears in this issue for George M. Dix. estate.


The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 7 Jan. 1893

The sad news of the death of Mr. and Mrs. Flavius Tripp's youngest child, comes to our ears as we go to press.


The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 29 Apr. 1893

A probate notice appears in this issue for Elizabeth S. Arnold.


The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 29 Apr. 1893

The little infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Morris died last Saturday morning at 5 a.m.


The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 2 Sep. 1893

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Nunley died and was buried here at the cemetery Thursday.


The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 2 Sep. 1893

Mr. J. Osborn died at his home at half past 12, and was buried in the cemetery Saturday. Obit next week.

 
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