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NameDate of DeathObituary
Arnold, Elizabeth S.1893The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 29 Apr. 1893 A probate notice appears in this issue for Elizabeth S. Arnold.
Barnes, Elizabeth1925The Perry Mirror, 21 May 1925, page 6, col. 3 DEATH OF MRS. BARNES Mrs. Elizabeth Barnes died Friday, May 15, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Guy Pearson, at Williamstown. Mrs. Barnes was 87 years old and more than 50 years of her life had been spent in and near Perry. The past 12 years she had made her home at Topeka with a daughter, Mrs. L. E. McCain. She went to Williamstown about a month ago to visit. Death was due to old age. Besides Mrs. Pearson and Mrs. McCain she is survived by three other children. Mrs. Fred Michael, Perry; Mrs. Sam Brown, Lawrence; and James Barnes, Topeka. Services were held Sunday afternoon at the Williamstown Baptist church. Burial was made in the Williamstown cemetery.
Carter, John Thomas1927The Oskaloosa Independent, 13 May 1927 OBITUARY/CARTER John Thomas Carter was born May 30, 1860, at Louisville, Ky., died May 6, 1927 at Oskaloosa, Kansas, aged near 77 years. He came to Kansas at the age of six years, grew to manhood near Oskaloosa. In 1867 was married to Sarah Thompson. To them were born six children (but only names 5??): Mary A. Suschanke, Nancy J. Henry, and Willie R., all deceased; Lewis H. of Endicott, Wash., and Laura F. Mueller, of St. Louis, Mo. In 1883 Mr. Carter was married to Melissa Robinson. To them were born five children: Jessie and Charles, deceased; Ida M. Trower, Topeka, Ks., Ludie Gensler, McLouth, Ks., Francis, of Walla Walla, Wash. His living brother and sisters are: Francis M. of Winchester, Kans., Charles of Elkhart, Ks., Ella Jeffries, Seward, Okla., Jane Jeffries, Edmond, Okla. Funeral service was conducted at the home hear Oskaloosa Sunday afternoon, May 8, by Rev. Dr. C. E. Kircher, pastor of the Presbyterian church. Hymns were sung by the Presbyterian male quartet. Interment was at Plum Grove. We wish to thank all who assisted us and gave expression of sympathy in our bereavement. Mrs. John Carter and family.
Carter, Melissa (Weir)1937The Oskaloosa Independent, 22 Apr. 1937 Mrs. JOHN CARTER Malissa, daughter of James and Catharine Weir, was born in Polk County, Mo., November 9, 1851, and passed from this life at the Bell Memorial hospital in Kansas City, April 11, 1937, at the age of 85 years. She came to Kansas in early womanhood and located near McLouth where she resided until the time of her death. In 1883 she was united in marriage with John Thomas Carter. To this union were born five children. They are Ludie Gensler of McLouth, and Francis of Walla Walla, Washington; Jesse, Charles and Ida having preceded her in death. Mrs. Carter was a member of the Oskaloosa Methodist church. In her last years she often expressed herself as waiting to be received by her Lord. She leaves to mourn her going besides Mrs. Gensler and Francis and John Robinson of Oskaloosa, a brother, also a son by a former marriage, fifteen grandchildren and ten great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the Oskaloosa M. E. church Tuesday afternoon with Rev. Earl O. Harbour officiating. Interment was made at Plum Grove.
Cathcart, Edith1961The Winchester Star,
Crosby, William1900The Winchester Star, Friday, August 24, 1900, page 1, col. Col. 3 County News and Comment Wm. Crosby, a prominent resident of Valley Falls, died at Colorado Springs last Friday morning. The remains were brought to Valley Falls for burial and funeral services were held Monday. The Valley Falls New Era, Saturday, August 25, 1900, page 1, col. 3 DEATH OF WM. CROSBY ---- A Severe Shock to His Many Friends Here - - - - DIED AT COLORADO SPRINGS - - - - His Death Caused From a Complication of Diseases After a Short Illness -- Funeral Monday - - - - Just before going to press last week the sad news was received that our townsman, William Crosby, had died in Colorado Springs. Mr. and Mrs. Crosby left this city Monday July 2, for Colorado Springs where they expected to remain until next April, where they have property interests, and where it was hoped Mr. Crosby's health would be benefitted by the change of climate. Mr. Crosby's health had been in a precarious condition for some time, and although there were days when he was very feeble, he was not thought to be in a serious state. After being in Colorado Springs a few weeks he was taken sick with mountain fever when a complication of diseases set in which caused his death. William Crosby was born October 13, 1832, in Hampden, Maine. He was born and reared to manhood upon the same farm where his father was born, coming from puritan stock Simon Crosby, from whom he descended having left the mother country and settled in Salem, Mass., in 1835. At the age of 20 he went to southern Illinois, where he remained two or three years, working as an assistant to the engineer, who had in charge the building of the Illinois Central railway. In the spring of 1855 with his brother Rufus, he came to Kansas, locating in Atchison county,. One year later they came to Valley Falls, then Grasshopper Falls, and this has been his home ever since, with the exception of short periods spent in Colorado Springs. In the fall of 1857 he married Mary Whitcomb who died in less than one year. In 1861 he married Jennie Wyman, to whom was born one son, in 1862, the mother surviving the birth of the child but a short time and he followed his mother when six seeks old. In the fall of 1894 he was united in marriage to Maria H. Prentice, who survives him, with their daughter Ruth, now the wife of Rev. Harold E. Anderson. Mr. Crosby inherited from his mother a conscientious nature which has ever been the guiding principle of life. In early manhood he identified himself with the followers of Christ. He was one of the founders and first deacon of the Congregational church in this place, and for most of the time since has continued to hold that office. He believed in applied Christianity, and all social, moral and political questions he decided by applying the principle of Christ's doctrine to them. His conscience allowed no compromise with wrong. During the early days of Kansas he took a prominent part as a Free State man. He was a member of the Free State legislature, which met in Topeka, July 4, 1856, but was dispersed by the United States troops. He with his brother, lost their entire property by the sacking of the town by the border ruffians. During the civil war he was a member of Co. K, 17th Kansas. Om 1869 he was elected and served one term in the Kansas legislature. He was never a seeker after office, but preferred to be with the minority in politics, when he considered them right. He was well known for his business integrity. He had many friends. His benefactions were without ostentation. It was his rule of life to deny himself luxuries that he might help to support the church and benevolent objects. He was ever a diligent man to the last days of his life and there is no doubt but his days were cut short by his desire to be engaged in useful occupation. The funeral services were held in the Congregational church Monday morning at 9: 30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Ralph Newman of Leavenworth. The church was handsomely decorated by the young people of the church, and every available space was occupied by his friends. Mayor Cowan issued a proclamation Monday morning requesting all business houses to close during the funeral service. After the services at the church a large procession of friends followed the remains to Rose Hill cemetery where the burial took place. The Valley Falls Vindicator, Friday, August 24, 1900, page 4, col. 4 DUST TO DUST The Mortal Remains of Wm. Crosby Laid to Rest. As briefly noted in these columns last week Wm. Crosby one of the pioneer business men of Valley Falls died in Colorado Springs Friday morning, , August 17, after a brief illness of Mountain fever, at the age of 67 years, 10 months and 4 days. The body was brought home Saturday evening and the funeral, attended by hundreds of sorrowing friends, was held in the Congregational church Monday at 9:30 a.m. Rev. Ralph Newman, a former pastor of this place, came up from Leavenworth, to make as he expressed it "a few parting remarks to a beloved friend -- not as a clergyman to preach a funeral sermon." The following notes compiled by a friend may be termed the principal milestones along the life pathway of Wm. Crosby, but of necessity there are omitted thousands of every day acts of charity, kindness and humanity which will be cherished by his fellow men so long as memory exists. May his reward be in accord with that broad mantle of charity with which he was ever wont to cover the frailties and shortcomings of those erring mortals who were unable to withstand the temptations to which the flesh is heir -- in short he was one of nature's noble men -- an honest man. - - - - William Crosby was born October 13, 1832, in Hampden, Maine. He was born and reared to manhood upon the same farm where his father was born, coming from Puritan stock. Simon Crosby from whom he descended, having left the mother country and settled in Salem, Mass., in 1635. At the age of 20, Mr. Crosby went to southern Illinois, where he remained two or three years, working as an assistant to the civil engineer, who had in charge the building of the Illinois Central railroad. In the spring of 1855, with his brother Rufus, he came to Kansas locating in Atchison county. One year later they came to Valley Falls, then Grasshopper Falls, and this has been his home every since, with the exception of short periods spent in Colorado Springs. In the fall of 1858 he married Mary Whitcome, who died in less than one year. In 1861 he married Jennie Wyman, to whom was born one son, in 1862, the mother surviving the birth of the child but a short time and the boy following his mother when but six weeks old. In the fall of 1864 he was united in marriage to Maria H. Prentice. Who survives him, with their adopted daughter Ruth, now the wife of Rev. Harold E. Anderson. Mr. Crosby inherited from his mother a conscientious nature which has ever been the guiding principle of his life. In early manhood he identified himself with the followers of Christ. He was one of the founders and first deacons of the Congregational church in this place, and for most of the time since has continued to hold that office. He believed in applied Christianity, and all social, moral and political questions he decided by applying the principles of Christ doctrine to them. His conscience allowed no compromise with wrong. During the early days of Kansas he took a prominent part as a Free States man. He was a member of the Free State legislature, which met in Topeka July 4, 1856, but was dispersed by the United States troops. He, with his brother, lost their entire property by the sacking of the town by the border ruffians. During the Civil War he was a member of Co. K. 17th Kansas. In 1869 he was elected, and served one term in the Kansas legislature. He was never a seeker after office, but preferred to be with the minority in politics, when he considered them right. He was well known for his business integrity. His benefactions were without ostentation. It was his rule of life to deny himself luxuries that he might help to support the church and benevolent objects. He was ever a diligent man to the last days of his life and there is no doubt but his days were cut short by his desire to be constantly engaged in some useful occupation.
Dix, George M.1894The Meriden Tribune, 28 Dec. 1894 A probate notice appears in this issue for George M. Dix. estate.
Jones, Randle1950The Oskaloosa Independent,
Kunkle, Cameron1908The Perry Mirror, Thursday, April 30, 1908, page 4, col. 3 CAMERON KUNKLE DEAD Cameron Kunkle died in Excelsior Springs last Sunday after an illness of several weeks with Bright's discase. The remains were brought here Monday and the funeral was held from the home of his sister, Mrs. Mary Martin, yesterday afternoon and was largely attended. The Rev. Shutt conducted the service. Burial was in Oak Ridge cemetery. Mr. Kunkle was born in Jefferson county, Kan., March 8, 1861, his age being 47 years, 1 month and 29 days. He was a man of generous disposition and enjoyed a large circle of friends. The deceased was a son of Mr. Jerome Kunkle and a brother of Mrs. Mary Martin and Walter Kunkle. A large number of relatives and friends from various sections of the country attended the funeral yesterday. The Oskaloosa Independent, Friday, May 1, 1908, page 4, col. 2 "Perry Items" Cameron Kunkel, the elder son of Capt. Jerome Kunkel, died at Excelsior Springs Sunday. The body was brought to Perry Monday and taken to the home of his sister, Mrs. Mary K. Martin, where the funeral was held Wednesday. There was a large attendance at the funeral, friends being present from Kansas City, Denver and other points. He is survived by his father, a brother and a sister.
Kunkle, Jerome1913The Perry Mirror, Thursday, April 10, 1913, page 5, col. 2 DEATH COMES TO JEROME KUNKEL Jerome Kunkel died at the home of his son, Walter Kunkel, near Williamstown, Wednesday morning, April 9, of senility, at the age of 86 years. He had been in poor health for several years and during the last year failed greatly in strength. Mr. Kunkel was born near Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pa., March 27, 1827, and was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Kunkel, who were among the early settlers of the Keystone state. He was very prominent in early history of this state, being a captain in a Kansas regiment during the Civil war and later served as a Representative from this district. He took part in the Mexican war, serving two years in the engagements against the southern republic. The funeral will be held at the home of Walter Kunkel at Williamstown, Friday morning, April 11, at 10 o'clock. Rev. D. A. Shutt of the East Side Methodist Episcopal church of Topeka will preach the sermon. The remains will be interred in the Kunkel lot in Oak Ridge cemetery north of Perry. The Oskaloosa Independent, Friday, April 18, 1913, page 4, col. 4 JEROME KUNKLE DEAD Jerome Kunkle was born near Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pa., Mar. 11, 1827, and died April 9, 1913, aged 86 years and 28 days. His boyhood was spent on his father's farm, where and at a time when education was not valued as it is today, but, when in 1846 a call for volunteers was made to go to the then far-away Mexico young Jerome, who was then 21 years old, enlisted as a private under Col. John W. Geary, and of the 96 men who enlisted only 27 were mustered out, which would tell that following Gen. Scott in his campaign in the subjugation of Mexico was a dangerous as well as a strenuous life, in 1848, after having returned home he was appointed aid-de-camp to Gov. Wm. E. F. Johnston of Pennsylvania, with the rank of lieutenant colonel. In 1854 he was appointed inspector of troops by Gov. William Bigier. In 1856 he again started westward and located at Rising Sun, just across the Kaw from Lecompton. The following year he returned to Pennsylvania and married Miss Christina Artley. Returning to Kansas the same year he now engaged in the arduous undertaking of establishing a home, helping to make Kansas a free state and rearing a family. These were turbulent times, and as Lecompton was a pro-slavery town and Rising Sun a free state village, and he the owner of the ferry at the time, he probably saw more and knew more of what was then going on than any other man in Jefferson county. When the turmoil and strife finally culminated in war, he again came to his country's aid by volunteering as a private; but was chosen captain of Co. D of the famous 11th Kansas Volunteers. In 1865 he was elected Representative from Jefferson county and again in 1876. Thus it will be seen that he was ever ready to serve his country either in the capacity of private citizen, soldier or lawmaker, as the occasion demanded. In June, 1887, he buried his wife who had borne him four children, three of whom grew to man and womanhood. Camerion, the eldest, was buried five years ago this month. Walter lives near Williamstown and Mary near Perry. The time intervening since then until death claimed him has been spent in part with children and part on some mining claims in New Mexico. During the last three years he has failed steadily in health and has divided his time between his daughter Mary and son Walter, where each ministered to his every want. The last year was spent at Walter's where kind hands and loving hearts did all they could to brighten his last days. Death came as a relief as he was willing and eager to go. Funeral conducted by Rev. D. A. Shutt of the East Side M. E. Church of Topeka and interment took place in Oak Ridge cemetery, north of Perry.
Lefever, Christopher1929The Oskaloosa Independent,
Lefever, Elting1957The Oskaloosa Independent,
Lefever, Sarah Jane (Sinnard)1928The Oskaloosa Independent,
McClellan, C. B.1911KANSAS PIONEER TRIES TO KILL HIMSELF The Topeka Daily Capital, 1 Sep. 1911 C. B. McClellan, of Oskaloosa Was Member of Wyandotte Convention Special to the Capital: Oskaloosa, Kan., Aug. 30- - - In a fit of temporary aberration of mind brought on by intense and prolonged suffering from illness, C. B. McClellan, of this place, attempted to end his life. Mr. McClellan has suffered with asthma for years, and as of late has been much worse than ever before, so that he has not been able to speak above a whisper for the last few days and has not been able to lie down for many weeks, and more than once said he would rather die than endure such suffering. This morning he asked his daughter for his razor and after shaving cut two gashes in his throat. The daughter coming into the room at the moment stopped any further effort. McClellan is 88 years old, settled here in 1857. He was a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention and one of the best known citizens in the county.
Morris, infant1893The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 29 Apr. 1893 The little infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Morris died last Saturday morning at 5 a.m.
Nunley, infant1893The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 2 Sep. 1893 The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Nunley died and was buried here at the cemetery Thursday.
Oroke, Georgia Anna (Dyson)1935The Oskaloosa Independent, 24 Jan. 1935 Mrs. GEORGIA OROKE Georgia Anna Dyson was born May 6, 1861, in Athens County, Ohio, and departed this life at her home in Oskaloosa, Kansas, January 17, 1935, at the age of 73 years. On January 1, 1880, she was united in marriage with James Franklin Oroke at McLouth, Kansas. To this union were born four sons, Edgar, dying in infancy, John Ray, Robert Emmet, and Charles Galen, all of Oskaloosa. Two others found this their home, John P. Robinson from the age of seven, and Mrs. Genie Taylor Walbridge of McLouth from the age of 12. Her husband preceded her in death by twenty-one years. For two years after her marriage she resided on a farm south of McLouth, later moving on a farm in the Tibbott neighborhood. Here she united with the United Brethren church then after moving to Oskaloosa transferred her membership to the Methodist church where she remained a faithful member. She leaves to mourn her death her three sons, ten grandchildren, two great grandchildren, two sisters, Mrs. Lucy Barnard, of Williamstown, Kansas, Mrs. Addie Ramey of Leavenworth, together with many other relatives and close friends. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon with Rev. Earl O. Harbour officiating. Interment was made in the McLouth Cemetery.
Osborn, J.1893The Meriden Weekly Tribune, 2 Sep. 1893 Mr. J. Osborn died at his home at half past 12, and was buried in the cemetery Saturday. Obit next week.
Robinson, John P.1937The Oskaloosa Independent,
Rogers, Reuben B.1919The Nortonville News,
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